The cargo ship "Dali" leaves Baltimore, almost 3 months after the collision with the bridge

the cargo ship dali left baltimore almost 3 months after the collision with the bridge
the cargo ship dali left baltimore almost 3 months after the collision with the bridge

The freighter Dali left the port of Baltimore for Virginia on Monday, nearly three months after it ran out of power and struck one of the legs of the Francis Scott Key Bridge, causing it to collapse. The 299-metre-long vessel began to move shortly before 8:30 a.m., being towed by four tugboats.

The ship "Dali" will go to the International Ship Terminal in Norfolk, Virginia, where it will undergo repairs from the damage caused during the collision with the bridge in Baltimore.

Shortly after leaving the port of Baltimore on March 26, the ship suffered a malfunction that caused it to lose its power supply and crash into one of the legs of the Francis Scott Key Bridge, killing six workers who were working on the bridge.

On May 20, she returned to port, nearly two months after being stranded in the massive steel wreckage of the collapsed bridge.

A National Transportation Safety Board investigation found that the ship experienced two power outages in the hours before it left the Port of Baltimore. In the moments before the bridge collapsed, it suffered another power outage and went off course. The National Transportation Safety Board is still investigating the cause of the power outage.

The FBI has also launched an investigation into the incident.

Last week, under a deal upheld by a federal judge, the Dali crew members were allowed to return home. None of the crew members had been able to leave the United States since the incident. Under the agreement, crew members can return to their seats but must be available to testify about the incident if called by authorities.

Thousands of port workers, truckers and small business owners have been affected by the incident, prompting local and state officials to take steps to make reopening the port and resuming water traffic at normal capacity a top priority in hopes of limiting the economic fallout.

Earlier this month, officials announced the reopening of the Fort McHenry Canal after clearing debris from the 213-foot-wide, 15-foot-deep canal.

Officials have said that they hope that the work on the construction of the bridge will be completed by 2028./Voa/

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